How to Avoid Becoming a Bridezilla

As a bride to be, planning a wedding can be extremely stressful, especially if you’ve been dreaming of your wedding since you were a little girl. Throwing tantrums, shouting, screaming and crying are all things we’ve seen on television when a future bride really loses it and falls to pieces because something’s not gone quite to plan. Others demand that their friends lose weight if they want to be a bridesmaid, refuse to accept advice from anyone and generally are not very nice to anyone. These are all symptoms of Bridezilla Syndrome.

Although your wedding is one of the most important days of your life – and you probably want your own way – you don’t want to be so unpleasant that none of your guests show up on the day. If you’re worried about becoming a monster in the lead-up to your wedding day, read our useful tips on remaining calm throughout the planning.

Involve the groom:

Your fiancé may want to leave most of the wedding up to you, something you are happy to do, but try to get him interested and involved in some parts of the day. Ask him to suggest ideas for the wedding transport and food and see if he’ll organize your honeymoon.

Talk to him about what he wants to wear and try to reach a compromise so that the ushers’ waistcoats and cravats match your bridesmaids’ dresses, but he can wear his Converse if he wants to. If he’s Scottish but you don’t want him to wear a kilt, you might just have to accept the fact that it’s his wedding too.

Listen to your friends and family:

Your parents and friends want to help you, so make use of them. Don’t boss them about but ask them what they’d like to help with. If your friend can’t even make toast, don’t ask her to make 50 cupcakes and if your brother is shy and hates public speaking, it might be better to get someone else to do a reading.

If your tomboy friend doesn’t want to wear pink but it’s your favorite color, don’t change the color scheme, but choose a style of dress that will suit her. Your bridesmaids won’t be happy in outfits that make them feel ridiculous so go dress shopping with your friends and respect their opinions on what suits them.

Let the small things go:

Of course, you want your wedding to be perfect, but once it’s over – the small things won’t matter. If the orders of service are slightly lighter than you wanted or the bread rolls served with the soup are wholemeal, not white, don’t react. In the grand scheme of things, these aren’t important.

If your husband takes off his jacket and ties as soon as you’ve said your vows, just be glad that he wore them for the ceremony. Your bridesmaids will probably take their heels off before the night is out as well, but it won’t make people think your wedding’s ruined.

Keep calm and carry on:

Don’t scream or shout at your fiancé, family or friends or there might not be a wedding. If you’re feeling stressed, take a few deep breaths, go for a walk and have a cup of tea. It’s important not to let your wedding take over so that nothing else matters, not even your husband to be.

Ban wedding talk after a certain time and try to book a weekend at a spa to relax you. You could incorporate this into your hen weekend so that your bridesmaids can also chill out and let their hair down, especially if you’ve been difficult to deal with recently.

Learn to laugh at yourself:

It’s very likely that there’ll be a tiny little issue at your wedding, even if it’s just your maid of honor breaking a nail seconds before you have to leave for the church or your car turning up 5 minutes late. Keep smiling and tell yourself that it’s not the end of the world and hasn’t ruined the day.

These things will keep the feeling light and could provide amusing stories to tell at future weddings. Your page boy may have fallen into the pond just before the ceremony starts, but just laugh it off – you can bring this tale up at his wedding.

It may be that your perfect wedding is just that, but you’ll be much happier if you’re relaxed and not focused on every single minute detail. Enjoy yourself and concentrate on the atmosphere and the significance of the day rather than how the napkins are folded.

John Lewis Wedding Insurance is there to protect you if something doesn’t quite go to plan, including helping you to cover the costs of postponing or canceling your wedding due to illness.

We provide six flexible levels of wedding cover for weddings and civil partnerships both abroad and in the UK and all the important things, such as the rings, the dress, and the cake are protected. To find out more and get a wedding insurance quote visit – www.johnlewis-insurance.com

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